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2020 IVSC-WAVO Global Valuation Conference June 4-5, 2020 | Seoul, Korea
2020 IVSC-WAVO Global Valuation Conference June 4-5, 2020 | Seoul, Korea

Technical Tour

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Tour Course

DMZ

On July 27, 1953, the Korean War ended with a cease-fire. The Northern and Southern Limit Lines were created as each side moved their troops back 2 km from the Military Demarcation Line. The lines reach 248 km in length from Jeongdong-ri, Paju-si to Myeongho-ri, Goseong-gun. At the present time, an area within 2 km of both the north and south side is designated as the DMZ (Demilitarized Zone). Excluding the DMZ, the overall area is considered to be the most heavily militarized region in the world.

Imjingak

Imjingak Resort, located 7 km from the Military Demarcation Line, is now at the forefront of tourism related to the Korean War. Imjingak was built in 1972 with the hope that someday unification would be possible. The three-storied Imjingak is surrounded by several monuments, Unification Park, and North Korea Center. In front of Imjingak is the Gyeongui Train Line, which was destroyed during the Korean War in 1950. It has been under reconstruction since 2000. Every year, many events for unification are held at Imjingak. It is now one of the more famous DMZ tourist spots for foreigners because it is possible to visit without going through any security check points.

The 3rd infiltration Tunnel

The 3rd Tunnel was discovered by South Korea in 1978. It spans over 1,635m in length, 2m in width, and 2m in height and is located 52km from Seoul. It is estimated that approximately 30,000 soldiers could move through the tunnel per hour. The scale is similar to the 2nd Tunnel, but it was thought to be more threatening as an invasion tool than the 1st and 2nd Tunnels. Located only 4km away from Imjingak toward the southwest and 3.5km from the Tongilchon area, it is accessible by car in approximately 45 min from Seoul

Dora Observatory

Situated in Paju-si, Gyeonggi-do and at the northernmost point of the Military Demarcation Line, Dora Observatory replaced the previous Songaksan Observation Post. From the observatory, visitors can overlook North Korea and various locations including Gaeseong, Songaksan, Kim Il-Sung Statue, and Cooperation Farm (Geumamgol). The observatory offers 500 seats, VIP rooms, and abundant parking space. It was first opened to the public in January 1987. Near the observatory is the Third Underground Tunnel, built by North Korea and found in 1978. It stretches over 1.6km with a height and width of 2m, capable of mobilizing 30,000 troops in one hour. In front of the tunnel are a variety of attractions such as the DMZ Media Hall (offering the history of the divided country and flourishing ecosystem in the Demilitarized Zone), DMZ Exhibition Hall (displaying relics and documents related to the Demilitarized Zone), sculptures, and souvenir shops. Visitors can see inside the tunnel by either walking or riding the monorail. Because civilian access is restricted in this area, visitors must participate in the DMZ Peace & Security Tourist Program (implemented by Paju-si) to visit the observatory. Conducted by a shuttle bus either from Imjingak Resort or Dorasan Station, it goes through the Dora Observatory, 3rd Underground Tunnel, Dorasan Station, and Unification Village. Visitors must carry their passport, which is examined at the checkpoint just beyond Unification Bridge.